17
Jun 13

My New Book, The Scalability Coefficient

Four and a half years, over 100k words, 318 pages, and two children later, the fruits of my labors have finally ripened. I’m extremely excited to announce The Scalability Coefficient, my first book, depicting a unique method of business analysis that helps anyone break down and digest any complex business.

As of today, you can find the book on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and TheScalabilityCoefficient.com.

I hope it may find its way to your coffee table and that you enjoy and maybe learn something from it.


08
Mar 11

Count Your Calories with Your Fingers, Not an Abacus

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again.  When you’re watching your weight, counting calories is one of the hardest things to do.  It’s 100% necessary, but can become the most mentally draining exercises you can partake in.  I’ve found myself in places where I will reconsider a bite of an extremely satisfying, lean and healthy sandwich I prepared myself as I’m recalculating the calories of my day in my head.  It’s maddening.  Not only can it drive you completely insane, but it’s a frustrating catalyst, making it near impossible to continue a healthy track for the rest of your life.  But again, it’s necessary.  You need to know how many calories you consume to lose or maintain your weight.  Weight is nothing more than an excess of calories.  Eat more than you burn, you gain; eat less than you burn, you lose.  But if you don’t know what you take in, you’re likely going to gain.  With the daunting task heading up to us all, here are some things you can do to make your life easier. Continue reading →


17
Feb 11

It’s VC, Not Entrepreneurs, That Drive New Innovation

For obvious reasons, it’s true.  Yet, at the same time, it’s sad.  It seems we have taken a strange turn in the direction of business within the “tech sector”.  With more and more drive to be the most popular and highest funded contender, less and less about the actual business.  True, they go hand in hand; without one, there isn’t the other.  Still, I beg the question: how did companies ever survive before the invent and widespread, public use of the Internet?  Sure, there was still the idea of venture capital, but there wasn’t he broad idea of a world-wide market place.  To few, there were: the corporate conglomerates that had made it to that level.  But nowhere in the American entrepreneur’s mind did they consider the fact that their first market should be the entire world.  Rather, it usually started with their town.  Then to their zip code.  Further to their county, state and so on.  The change took place when the business landscape changed and the barriers to travel across the world and back instantaneously and transparently. We should really expect nothing less.  If given the chance to run faster, jump higher, lift more, eat more; we take it.  We’re human.  It’s our blessed nature to want more, take more and reach higher.  It’s one of the few things we know and do really well.  My question still stands though: why?  When you ask that question of yourself, you should see the doors that open. Continue reading →


08
Feb 11

Don’t Diet to Lose Weight. Seriously.

Sorry, no cliché intended.  Yet, as I mentioned before, I have a smidgen of things I’ve learned across my decade long battle with dropping 100 pounds.  This is the first post directed to health & fitness and for good reason: it’s the most important one I’ve learned over the years: forget dieting, change your life. Continue reading →


03
Feb 11

Building a Business on the Cheap

One of the biggest barriers to entry into the world of starting your own business is the fear of letting go of the almighty dollar.  As is with myself, nobody wants to put their family, mortgage, cars and general lifestyle at risk to start something that may fail.  This is fair.  This is also the underlying foundation of how I think about every business opportunity: other than my own time (which is for another day), will the new idea stress my pocket?  When the answer is “No”, I get excited.  Over the years and through a number of failed ventures, I’ve learned a few tricks.  Mind you, each failed venture has cost me little.  Say a couple hundred bones.  Some would say the failure of the business is in part due to my lack of personal funding.  On the contrary, I’ve found that a little funding is enough to see if there is interest.  There is a lot to a business that can be done for very cheap.  Here’s some ideas:

Continue reading →